Bloggerhood Etc. 3/2/15

Oren with his wife and kids.

Photo from A Blogger and a Father

This is a hard place to start, but the only place I can start. The Dad Bloggers community lost a friend and colleague on Saturday when Oren Miller passed away after a ten-month fight against cancer. I didn’t know Oren beyond the words in his blog and on the Dad Bloggers Facebook page, so I’m not one to write a tribute. I’ll leave that to his closest friends. But I can share the gift he left us.

Biggest Loss. A Blogger and a Father by Oren Miller. His words will be missed.

Best Advice.Unity, not Uniformity” by Rita Ferrone at Commonweal.

Best Prayer.God Have Mercy on Us” by Matthew Paul Turner.

Best Interview.Sarah Bessey – A Faith, Art, and Motherhood Interview” by Jerusalem Greer.

Best Story.The Girl Who Gets Gifts from Birds” by Katy Sewall at BBC News Magazine.

Most Outrageous.The Danger of Being Neighborly Without a Permit” by Conor Friedersdorf at CityLab.

Best Special Needs Post.Dirty Bird” by Robert Rummel-Hudson at Support for Special Needs.

Best Compliment.What One Courageous Dad Taught Me at Dad 2.0 Summit” by Christian Toto at Daddylibrium.

Best Reflection.This is How We Survive the Winter” by Addie Zierman at How to Talk Evangelical.

Best Question.Would Headlights Work at Light Speed?” by Vsauce (via YouTube).

To catch up on the great posts I’m reading online and to get a sneak preview of next week’s candidates, check out my new Around the Blogosphere board on Pinterest.

Bloggerhood Etc. 1/12/15

Lit candle

A candle for Cornelia and Chris. Praying for a full and fast recovery.

Before I get to the best of the week, I have a prayer request to pass along. Fellow writer and parent Cornelia Seigneur and her husband Chris were hit by a car Friday evening while taking a walk. A hour before the accident, Cornelia wrote a post about appreciating the people in our lives… ..saying “you just never know when you’ll see people – savor moments with people…” I’ve featured her post here before and I want to start off this week’s blog roundup with her writing …

Most Poignant.Having a Mary Mindset in a Martha World” by Cornelia Becker Seigneur.

Best Special Needs Post.A World of Fairness” by Robert Rummel-Hudson at Support for Special Needs.

Best Advice.To Get Nominated for an Oscar, it’s Still Best to be a Mediocre Movie About a White Guy” by Todd VanDerWerff at Vox.

Best Dad Post.Dad, Am I Pretty?” by John Kinnear at Ask Your Dad.

Best Commentary.The Limits of Philanthropy” by Fran Quigley at Commonweal.

Most Creative Prediction.Who Will Win the Oregon-Ohio State Championship Game? Let’s Ask ‘The Oregon Trail’” by Matt Brown at Land-Grant Holy Land.

Best Response.I’m Tired of Hearing That Everything Crappy is Feminized” by Simcha Fisher at I Have to Sit Down.

Best LEGO Creation …

Robot made from a LEGO Juice Bar

JUICEBOT! (Photo via Imgur)

Best Interview.Looking Past the Pain of Alzheimer’s to Find the Unexpected Poetry of the Aging Brain;” John Allemang interviews Cathie Borrie, author of The Long Hello, at The Toronto Globe and Mail.

Most Thought-Provoking.The Feminist Case Against Abortion” by Serrin M. Foster at America.

Best Satire.Dirty Slush Machine Provides Children In Florida Taste Of Winter” by the staff at The Onion.

Most Moving.The Parents” by Rachel Held Evans.

Best Reflection.On Going to (an Episcopal) Church” by Jonathan Martin at Medium.

Best Farewell.Breaking Madden: The Quest for 18,356 Rushing Yards in One Game” by Jon Bois at SB Nation. 

And BEEFTANK wept, for he had no more worlds to conquer. But then he smiled, for he always had more milks.

The Light is Coming …

Dawn at Trillium Lake

Trillium Lake, Oregon. Photo: William Woodward (CC BY-NC 3.0), 2014.

Anna is back in school this week, which means no more sleeping in for anyone. We are up at 6:20 a.m., and because it’s winter and we live in Oregon it’s still dark.

It’s dark when she says goodbye to Julia, who leaves for work at 6:30 each morning.

It’s dark when she gets her mini-breakfast (the small snack she has when she gets up to hold her until her “real breakfast” at school).

It’s dark when she brushes her teeth and gets dressed.

It’s dark when she feeds our two guinea pigs and checks their hay and water.

It’s dark when she packs her lunch (on the days she packs lunch instead of getting it at the cafeteria).

And it’s dark when we walk to the bus stop together, and she gives me a hug and kiss goodbye.

Every morning now, and for the next month or so, we will start our day in the dark.

But the light is coming and that’s what today is about. The light that came into the world at Christmas is the same light that the Magi sought out when they journeyed to Bethlehem. They were only the first of many who would come to that light. Soon, nations would stream to it and a humble birth in a stable that was probably a cave used for quartering animals at night would become the most celebrated holiday in the world.

The light is coming, as sure as the sunrise. And as at the sunrise, the darkness will flee before it.

Before him.

Something to remember when the darkness gets you down. The light is coming.

Cheerleaders of Faith

Igloos vs. Snow Forts

Dorky Dad on “Building ‘Shelter’ out of Snow:”

I have a neighbor who builds an igloo in his front yard every winter. And then he and his kids sleep in it.

He told me about this at a party at Christmas. Logically, I should have chuckled at the very silliness of it all: “You mean you’re working hard to build a house made of snow just outside the very nice home that you undoubtedly spend a considerable sum of money every year to heat?” Alas, that was not my first thought. Instead, I just thought this:

“Dang. I NEED to build my very own igloo RIGHT THIS VERY MOMENT.”

Inspired by his igloo-building neighbor, he enlists his kids in the building of a snow fort. And not any snow fort but one “originally planned to have multiple levels and running water .” It doesn’t quite work out though.

The problem—as I see it— is that my fellow dad (and, according to my wife, fellow dork) forgot the key difference between igloos and a snow forts. While igloos are built for shelter, snow forts are built solely as base from which to launch snowball attacks. They need to be large enough to hold you, two or three friends, and a huge pyramid-shaped stack of ammunition, and tall enough to offer protection from the inevitable retaliatory barrage.

My wife’s right. I am a dork.