Bloggerhood Etc. 6/8/15

Oh no, baby GODZILLA!

Photo: Jeff Wysaski.

Best Photoblog.Prankster Replaces Pet Names With New Labels In Local Pet Store” by Jeff Wysaski at Sad and Useless (via Obvious Plant Care).

Best Diagram.The Shape of Story” by Christina Wodtke at Elegant Hack.

Best Comic.Beer” at xkcd.

Best List.5 Steps Toward Making Friends Out of Enemies” by Benjamin J. Corey at Formerly Fundie.

Most Mind Bending. “The Moon Terminator Illusion” by VSauce (via YouTube).

Best Dad Post.Duck, Duck, Sloane” by Gary Mathews at Skipah’s Realm.

Best Special Needs PostHer Fight, Our Fight” by Laura Smith at SLP Mommy of Apraxia.

Best Request.Dear Donald Miller: Thank You, and Please Stop” by Emily A. Dause at Slivers of Hope.

 Most Tragic.Two Lanes to Accockeek” by Michael Graff at SB Nation.

Best Cover of a Cover.Mad World” by Peter Hollens via YouTube.

To catch up on all the great posts I’m reading online and to get a sneak preview of future candidates, check out my Around the Blogosphere board on Pinterest.

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Bloggerhood Etc. 2/2//15

Cornelia Seigneur at home.

Cornelia Becker Seigneur (Photo: Vern Uyetake/West Linn Tidings)

Best News.Walking On: Longtime (West Linn) Residents Working to Get Back on Their Feet After Serious Accident” by Patrick Malee at West Linn Tidings.

Best Parenting Post.Sympathetic Pregnancy Hits the Chaos Team” by Evelyn Shoop at Momsicle.

Bravest.Good Girls Don’t Get Depressed” by Cara Strickland at Tanya Marlow’s Thorns and Gold.

Best Special Needs Post.Sharing in the Sorrow of Others” by Sandra Peoples at Not Alone.

Best Answer to a Stupid Question.Pope Francis, Radical Leftist?” by Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig at The New Republic.

Best Rant.If Any of You Mention Oils, I Will Punch You in the Face” by Melanie Dale at Coffee + Crumbs.

Best Essay.What the World Will Speak in 2115” by John H. McWhorter at The Wall Street Journal.

Best Reminder.The Holocaust’s Forgotten Victims: The 5 Million Non-Jewish People Killed By The Nazis” by Louise Ridley at Huff Post UK.

Best Literary Analysis.‘I am No Man’ Doesn’t Cut It: The Story of Eowyn” by Mariah Huehner at The Mary Sue.

Best Book Review.Apraxia Monday: A Meditation on Play” a review of Savage Park by Leslie Lindsay at Speaking of Apraxia.

Best Interview.Cardinal Marx on Francis, the Synod, Women in the Church and Gay Relationships” by Luke Hansen S.J. at America.

Best Video.I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” by Peter Hollens, featuring Sabrina Carpenter. (via YouTube).

The Two Kinds of Pride

Cheetah and two cubs

Photo: Julia Ozab

I’m struggling with pride. Not the sin itself—though I’ve certainly fallen into that trap many times—but with the word.

Why? Because there are two kinds of pride. And neither of them is a group of big cats.

We all know the sin of pride. It’s one of the seven deadly sins, which doesn’t mean its worse than other sins, but that it’s foundational. Pride is a root human condition, like lust, greed, envy, anger, laziness, and gluttony, that leads us astray. We all experience these temptations and when we act on them we sin.

But there’s another kind of pride. The pride a parent feels for a child, or the pride a child feels when doing something good, noble, or generous. Plus there’s the behavior code of Anna’s school, a code called Cheetah Pride.

  • Perseverance.
  • Respect.
  • Integrity.
  • Diversity.
  • Excellence.

All noble ideals, summed up in the acronym PRIDE.

So what’s the problem? Well Anna is having trouble understanding the difference between the two kinds of pride. I don’t want to discourage her outgoing spirit, which has flourished at her new school over the last year-and-a-half, and I want her to take pride in her accomplishments. Above all, between her apraxia and her new braces, I don’t want her to retreat into a shell.

But I don’t want her boasting either, and sometimes she does it without realizing. The first time I caught her boasting I tried to talk to her about pridefulness.

“What’s wrong with pride?” she asked. It was a tough question to answer. I had to find a different word that conveyed the bad pride.

And I did. Hubris.

Arrogant, pompous, conceited, and self-important. That’s the bad kind of pride. So from now on I will say “pride” for the good kind of pride and “hubris” for the bad kind.

And I’ve expanded her already large vocabulary. Which is a good reason for us both to be proud.

Cheerleaders of Faith

Bloggerhood Etc. 11/17/14

Expensive and complicated watch

Photo: Sotheby’s

Geekiest.The Story of the Most Complicated Watch in the World” by Luke Jones at BBC Magazine.

Most Fascinating New Book.Fierce Convictions by Karen Swallow Prior,” reviewed by Elizabeth Esther and Cara Strickland (with giveaways!)

Best Special Needs Post.Astronaut” by Robert Rummel-Hudson at Support for Special Needs.

Best Dad Post.My 2-Year-Old Daughter Was Pressured About Body Image and Marriage” by Lorne Jaffe at Huff Post Parents.

Best List.5 Steps for Choosing Where to Spend Your Donation Dollars” by Andee Zomerman at Nature of a Servant.

Best Dumb Idea.Breaking Madden: Beast Mode, 3,000 players, and one controller” by Jon Bois at SB Nation.

A bee! AAAA!!!

Image: Jon Bois

Best Question.Do Democrats want pro-choice purity or to win elections?” by Kristen Day and Robert Christian at The Hill.

Best Blog Hop.#8TerribleTitles” by Kiersi Burkhart and other MG and YA writers that are part of The Sweet Sixteens.

Best Award.Vatican Astronomer and Jesuit Brother Guy Consolmagno Wins the Carl Sagan Medal” by Sarah Christian in Millennial.

Best Guest Post.The Listening Program” by Kelly Pinkham at Jake’s Journey.

Best New Font.Dyslexie Typeface (for people with dyslexia)” by Christian Boer, featured in De Zeen.

Best Instructional Video.How to Be a Good Guest or Host” by Glove and Boots (via YouTube).

Watching Her Bloom

Anna's Newborn Picture

Photo: Julia Ozab

We have so many dreams for our children when they are born. From the first moment we see them—those tiny, wrinkled, sleepy, screamy, adorable little people—we imagine what they might look like and be like in every stage of their lives. We can’t help it.  We know we can’t know what will come, but we imagine it anyway.

And then we watch them bloom, and they are more beautiful than we could possibly imagine.

Anna jumping

Photo: Julia Ozab

Anna is eight-and-a-half tomorrow. It’s been  almost eight-and-half years since I held her for the first time, since I said “hello” to the little girl I only found out was a girl a few minutes earlier. Almost eight-and-a-half years since we named her and began imagining what her life would be like.

Some of it was pretty close. We knew about her cleft, and her upcoming surgery, and the possibilities of more problems and more procedures in the future. But we didn’t know about her apraxia of speech, or the years or therapy it would entail, or her future struggle with handwriting.

We also didn’t know how resilient she would be, how whip-smart, how funny, how outgoing, or how deeply thoughtful and caring about all of God’s creatures.

At a coastal viewpoint

Photo: Julia Ozab

She’s bloomed into an amazing girl, and she is blooming into an amazing woman. And while it pains us to watch her grow up, knowing that each moment once past is gone forever, it fills us with joy to watch her blossom into the person she is becoming.

The person God imagined all along.

Five Minute Friday

Bloggerhood Etc. 5/19/14

Apraxia Awareness Day

Last Wednesday, May 14th, was Apraxia Awareness Day and a lot of apraxia parents shared their stories on the blogosphere. I share a story of my own along with several others here today in a special Apraxia Awareness edition of Bloggerhood Etc.

The Lemonade Stand” by David Ozab.

One Girl’s Journey with Apraxia” by Mary at The iMums.

Every Child Deserves a Voice” by Karleigh at Living, Loving, Creating.

What is Apraxia and Why Should You Care?” by Lea Ciceraro at Life, Love, and My Lens.

Apraxia Awareness Day” by Kelly Bawden at The Hello Online Blog.

Coffee and a Conversation” by Kim Bond Thompson at Craft, Create, Connect.

Apraxia Awareness Day” by Katherine Sanford.

My Daughter’s Story” by Annette at This Simple Home.

Apraxia Awareness Day 2014” by Tori at Jake’s Journey to be a Little Man.

Be Careful What You Ask For …” by Frederic Gray.

Apraxia is Elusive, Even to Professionals” by Laura Smith at SLP Mommy of Apraxia.

2014 Apraxia Awareness Day Video Contest” (playlist), winning entries by Emily Purdy, Jennifer Helm, and The Miesners on the Apraxia-KIDS YouTube Channel.