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Bald Eagle Photoblog

Bald eagle facing slightly to viewer's right. (Photo @2013, Julia M. Ozab)

Photo: Julia Ozab

A description of the Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from Cascades Raptor Center.

This majestic bird of prey, our national symbol, has a distinctive adult color scheme – white head, white tail, dark brown body, yellow eyes, and massive yellow beak. As with many other raptors, the female is larger than the male and the sexes look alike. It takes four years for immature birds to develop the characteristic adult plumage pattern, so identifying young birds can be confusing. Juveniles resemble Golden Eagles in being generally brown, but they lack the golden head, and their legs are only feathered halfway to the foot. Immature birds of both species are brown with areas of white; young Golden Eagles have areas of white on the tail and the base of the flight feathers, while young Bald Eagles show more variable patterns of white speckling. The Bald Eagle has a relatively large head, and long, straight-edged wings; young birds have broader wings and longer tails than adults. This eagle flies with slow, shallow, powerful wingbeats, and soars with wings held out flat.

More information on CRC’s resident bald eagles here.

Bald eagle profile facing viewer's left.  (Photo @2013, Julia M. Ozab)

Photo: Julia Ozab

Bald eagle head on.  (Photo @2013, Julia M. Ozab)

Photo: Julia Ozab

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4 thoughts on “Bald Eagle Photoblog

    • It’s amazing how widespread they are. I remember when they were critically endangered, and now, not only can I see the resident eagles at the Raptor Center and Wildlife Safari any time I visit, but I’ve also spotted a few wild ones flying around town over the last couple of years.

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      • *nod* There’s a known wild nest near the local reservoir here, too… They were pointing out on the radio today the eagles being a good marker of the success of the endangered species act…

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